14 Things That Happen to Your Body When You Lose Sleep?

1. Dull Skin:

One of the first things you’ll notice when your body doesn’t get enough shut-eye is that it looks terrible. “Sleep deprivation decreases human growth hormone (HGH) levels by as much as 60 percent, which speeds up the aging process,” says Michael Roizen, MD, chief wellness officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute.

HGH helps keep skin looking youthful by increasing collagen and elastin levels, so when there’s less of the stuff in your system, you get bags under your eyes and fine lines—not to mention sallow or dull skin.

2. Reducing Immunity:

Several studies have suggested that losing sleep weakens the immune system; one study showed that people who missed out on sleep were three times as likely to get a cold.

3. Poor Concentration & Decreased Productivity:

Lack of sleep can cause you to feel unfocused, have trouble remembering things, and be less productive the next day at work or school. You might even lose your train of thought in the middle of conversations or forget what you were going to say, says Dr. Roizen.

4. Losing Weight:

When your body isn’t getting enough rest, your levels of cortisol—the stress hormone that causes weight gain around the midsection—increase. Plus, “if you’re not sleeping well, then you’re more likely to go for foods that don’t promote good health,” says Anne Foster-Rosales, MD, MPH, author of the Sleep Better, Live Better book series.

5. Reducing Sex Drive:

“It’s well known that men need healthy testosterone to make sex drive possible,” says Dr. Roizen. When cortisol interrupts your sleep cycle (the later you stay up, the more it disrupts the deep sleep you get during the first half of your night), it can interfere with your body’s natural testosterone levels and lower your interest in sex too.

6. Aches & Pains:

Joint pain is one of the most common complaints of people who are tired all day long; others report headaches or muscle pain in their shoulders or back. One reason for this is that sleeping allows our muscles to recover, which means if you’re not getting enough, you’re more likely to develop a chronic condition like osteoporosis.

7. Disrupted Menstrual Cycle:

When your sleep cycle is thrown off balance by stress or sleep problems, it can affect the function of the hypothalamus—the part of your brain that controls hormones and body temperature.

As a result, “women with extreme menstrual irregularities often have poor-quality sleep due to anxiety,” says Dr. Rosales.

8. Memory Loss:

If you find yourself nodding off during meetings or falling asleep at your desk after lunchtime, then chances are that you’re regularly missing out on z’s—and severely impacting your memory as a result. Researchers from UC found that people who lack quality sleep are more likely to have memory issues, which is because the brain needs sleep to consolidate new memories and stabilize existing ones.

9. Aches & Pains:

Joint pain is one of the most common complaints of people who are tired all day long; others report headaches or muscle pain in their shoulders or back. One reason for this is that sleeping allows our muscles to recover, which means if you’re not getting enough, you’re more likely to develop a chronic condition like osteoporosis.

10. Diabetes Risk:

You already know that poor sleep can lead to weight gain, but another thing it does is mess with insulin production—and increase your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. “Too little shut-eye can increase insulin resistance and activate the enzyme that converts blood sugar into fat,” says Dr. Roizen. “Plus, studies show that sleep-deprived people who take insulin to control their diabetes don’t respond as well to the treatment.”

11. Heart Disease:

If you already have heart disease, getting less than 5 hours of sleep a night increases your risk of sudden cardiac death by about 400 percent and may even double your chance of having a heart attack or stroke .

12. Depression:

The link between psychological health and quality sleep is well documented: Not only does poor-quality shut-eye cause depression in people with existing mental illness, but it can also make us more susceptible to developing it in general (and much earlier on in life ).

13. Bad Breath:

Bad breath is a signal that your body is suffering from stress, and some of the most common things that create this kind of stress are smoking cigarettes or drinking too much coffee. If you’re not getting enough sleep, those will both increase, which means your breath might not be as fresh as you’d like it to be during meetings and other social occasions.

14.- Letting Chronic Sleep Problems Go Unchecked Can Be Deadly:

People who suffer from insomnia, restless leg syndrome (RLS), or any type of sleep disorder — even if the condition hasn’t been diagnosed —are more likely to have accidents at home or on the job that lead to injury or death. In fact, according to a new report from Harvard researchers, people with untreated sleep disorders are 4.5 times more likely to die prematurely than people who get enough rest.

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