Alzheimer’s disease causes and risk factors?

According to Alzheimer’s Association, there are more than five million Americans with AD and nearly 20 million people providing care for someone who has the disease. AD is a chronic degenerative brain disorder that causes problems in thinking and memory (dementia) and eventually death.

About two-thirds of the cases of dementia worldwide are caused by AD. However, about 10 percent of AD cases occur when another condition or substance affects brain function. The term “age-related” refers to either normal or pathological processes associated with aging.

Aging can have various effects on different parts of the body, including the nervous system. Symptoms may include memory loss, confusion, impaired reasoning, poor judgment, depression, and personality changes. Cataracts are another cause of dementia.

The risk of AD is associated with increasing age, family history, and genetics. People who have a close relative (father, mother, brother, or sister) with the disease are at increased risk for developing AD.

The exact cause is unknown but some factors contribute to this condition like diet, medical problems, etc. Alzheimer’s disease is the 6th leading cause of death in America among people aged 75 years or older. It accounts for 3 percent of all deaths in the country which roughly translates to about 71,000 fatalities every year. Two-thirds of these deaths are among women.

AD may be caused by some external reasons also; environmental diseases like lead poisoning can lead to AD due to the accumulation of toxic substances in brain tissue. In some cases, the disease may be caused due to nutritional deficiencies or a lack of Vitamin B12 and folic acid in the blood.

Low levels of blood calcium have been linked to a higher risk for AD. Nutrients that help prevent AD include Vitamin E, Vitamin C, niacinamide (vitamin B3), beta-carotene, zinc, and selenium.

Alzheimer’s is a degenerative disorder associated with aging that progressively impairs memory (especially new learning) and other cognitive abilities over 5 to 20 years. It is characterized by beta-amyloid deposits (clumps of protein) in the cortex and neurofibrillary tangles within nerve cells together with neuron loss and a variable degree of cortical atrophy.

Alzheimer’s is the most common form of dementia among older adults. There are numerous risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease, including genetics, lifestyle choices, and age, however, up to this date, there is no established cause of the disorder. Alzheimer’s has been cited as occurring in 10% of individuals over 65 years old and 20-40% in those over 75 years old.

This risk seems to increase with greater age and it is estimated that one-third of people above 85 years old have some degree of senile dementia: Alzheimer’s affects almost half (estimated) among these individuals and accounts for about 70% or more than two-thirds of all dementias. Individuals who live to be 100 years old are likely to have some degree of senile dementia. The prevalence is estimated at 47 million people worldwide.

According to Alzheimer’s Association, there are more than five million Americans with AD and nearly 20 million people providing care for someone who has the disease. AD is a chronic degenerative brain disorder that causes problems in thinking and memory (dementia) and eventually death.

About two-thirds of the cases of dementia worldwide are caused by AD. However, about 10 percent of AD cases occur when another condition or substance affects brain function. The term “age-related” refers to either normal or pathological processes associated with aging.

Aging can have various effects on different parts of the body, including the nervous system. Symptoms may include memory loss, confusion, impaired reasoning, poor judgment, depression, and personality changes. Cataracts are another cause of dementia.

Alzheimer’s disease treatment:

This is a new article from the Alzheimer Research Forum. This forum discusses a possible treatment for Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers have been able to show how a single dose of THC can improve memory performance in older mice and have begun testing this as a potential treatment protocol in human trials.

Memory problems are one of the early symptoms of dementia, especially Alzheimer’s disease. Scientists don’t yet know whether your memories fade as you get older because certain brain cells lose their function or there aren’t enough neural pathways, to begin with. In other words, it’s unclear whether age affects memory because we have fewer neurons that connect information or because those connections weaken over time.

If scientists knew what caused this cognitive decline, they might be able to fix it by developing medicine. But because they don’t fully understand what causes memory loss in humans, much less how to treat it, Alzheimer’s disease is so far incurable.

Alzheimer’s disease stages:

Memory loss is one of the first symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease. As Alzheimer’s progresses, it kills more and more neurons in the brain, causing severe damage to areas that control thought, language, and memory. This can lead to changes in personality or behavior because certain parts are affected earlier than others.

pathophysiology of Alzheimer’s disease:

Alzheimer’s disease is a disorder of the brain that causes problems with memory, thinking, and behavior. It is characterized by beta-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. Beta-amyloid plaques are clusters of protein fragments and fibers found outside cells. Neurofibrillary tangles are twisted strands of protein inside nerve cells.

Alzheimer’s disease usually starts slowly, with mild symptoms worsening over several years. This initial stage of Alzheimer’s disease is called presenile or early-onset Alzheimer’s disease. In most cases, the first noticeable symptom of this type of Alzheimer’s is forgetfulness, especially for recent events or information encountered again daily, such as being able to remember conversations but not the names of people who were there.

Alzheimer’s disease prognosis:

Alzheimer’s disease can disrupt everyday life and make it hard for you to complete tasks. Symptoms may be mild initially but increase in severity. As Alzheimer’s continues to develop, you will need more assistance with daily activities. The time between diagnosis and death is usually three to nine years, but maybe as short as one year or as long as ten years.

Alzheimer’s disease prevention:

You can’t change your genes or stop the aging process to prevent Alzheimer’s disease. But you may be able to lower your risk of developing the disease by following a healthy lifestyle: exercising regularly, maintaining a healthy weight and diet, staying mentally active, and managing chronic conditions such as high blood pressure and diabetes.

Alzheimer’s disease pathophysiology:

Scientists don’t yet know whether memory loss with aging results from fewer brain cells that connect information or because those connections weaken over time. In other words, it’s unclear whether age affects memory because we have fewer neurons that connect information or because those connections weaken over time.

Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by beta-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. Beta-amyloid plaques are clusters of protein fragments and fibers found outside cells. Neurofibrillary tangles are twisted strands of protein inside nerve cells.

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