Going Gluten-Free for MS? Here Are 6 Easy Recipes?

Gluten-free diets have been getting a lot of attention in the news lately. Many people are going gluten-free to lose weight or with the hope that it will help them with everything from diabetes to high cholesterol. But gluten-free diets may also be able to provide some relief for those who suffer from multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a new study published in Neurology Today’s Research Review.

In a trial involving 59 patients at a hospital in Iran, two groups were randomly selected and assigned different diets:

Those on a gluten-free diet had no exposure to foods containing wheat, rye, barley, and oats. The other group was on a regular diet is which included these foods. After six months, all of the participants were evaluated for pain, depression, and disability.

After analyzing the data from the patients on a gluten-free diet compared with those not on a gluten-free diet, researchers found that those on a gluten-free diet had significantly less pain and depression as well as an improved overall score of disability by 32%.

In addition to following the stricter gluten-free diet, one group was also assigned to receive omega 3 fatty acids. In addition to possibly providing some relief for MS sufferers, omega 3s have been linked with improving mental health overall as well as reducing inflammation. The improvements in test scores continued through 24 weeks or four months after going off a strict or regular gluten-free diet. Though going off the strict gluten-free plan was not associated with a regression in symptoms, the researchers felt that longer-term testing was warranted.

While this study isn’t able to prove whether or not gluten-free diets are beneficial for people with MS, it does provide an interesting translation for further investigation of how wheat gluten proteins play a role in inflammation and neurological degeneration. This is especially important since some experts have suggested that neurodegenerative diseases such as MS are partially due to food allergies or sensitivities.

Though you can’t go wrong with any recipe out there, this roundup includes some recipes that are friendly on the stomachs of those who follow a gluten-free diet. Enjoy snacks like chicken lettuce wraps, protein bars, and chocolate chip cookies so good they don’t even taste gluten-free.

gluten-free recipes

on how to lose weight on a gluten-free diet

Gluten-free foods:

One of the first things you’re likely to notice if you or a family member is diagnosed with celiac disease or gluten intolerance is that grocery items labeled “wheat-free” are everywhere. There is also more choice in terms of bread, pasta, muffins, and other foods without wheat flour. However, many of these products are not gluten-free – they may contain oats or malt flavoring derived from barley, both of which contain gluten proteins. Look for items labeled specifically 100% gluten-free*.

Here’s a guide to some common supermarket items indicating whether they are safe on the gluten-free diet:

Baked goods. Gluten-free bread is becoming increasingly common at supermarkets but beware of any product that lists wheat flour, wheat starch, or malt flavoring. Ingredients to watch for also include oats (usually found in the form of oat bran or rolled oats), whole barley, and rye.

. Gluten-free loaves of bread are becoming increasingly common at supermarkets but beware of any product that lists wheat flour, wheat starch, or malt flavoring. Ingredients to watch for also include oats (usually found in the form of oat bran or rolled oats), whole barley, and rye. Breadcrumbs. Most brands, such as Progresso and Hodgson Mill, are gluten-free – just check the label to make sure they don’t add other ingredients such as milk powder which may contain gluten proteins from cross-contamination during processing.

. Most brands, such as Progresso and Hodgson Mill, are gluten-free – just check the label to make sure they don’t add other ingredients such as milk powder which may contain gluten proteins from cross-contamination during processing. Breakfast cereals. Many of the most popular brands are now labeled gluten-free or made with corn or rice rather than wheat. Chex is a good example. However, even if the cereal doesn’t list wheat on the label, it could still be contaminated due to shared processing equipment with regular products that do contain wheat flour.

. Many of the most popular brands are now labeled gluten-free or made with corn or rice rather than wheat. Chex is a good example. However, even if the cereal doesn’t list wheat on the label, it could still be contaminated due to shared processing equipment with regular products that do contain wheat flour. Candy and chocolate .

Many candy bars and chocolates are now labeled gluten-free – look for those made by Hershey, Nestle, and Dove which now produce gluten-free confections. Mars, however, does NOT make a gluten-free product as of December 2009 (due to contamination issues).

. Many candy bars and chocolates are now labeled gluten-free – look for those made by Hershey, Nestle, and Dove which now produce gluten-free confections. Mars, however, does NOT make a gluten-free product as of December 2009 (due to contamination issues). Coffee creamers .

There is some debate about the gluten-free status of these products. Some manufacturers, such as International Delight and Horizon Organic, are said to make a 100% gluten-free product (followed by an “S” in the case of International Delight). However, some celiac support groups still say you should avoid flavored creamers because they may contain barley-based flavoring, including natural flavors.

. There is some debate about the gluten-free status of these products. Some manufacturers, such as International Delight and Horizon Organic, are said to make a 100% gluten-free product (followed by an “S” in the case of International Delight).

However, some celiac support groups still say you should avoid flavored creamers because they may contain barley-based flavoring, including natural flavors. Corn tortilla chips. Most major brands are considered gluten-free but beware of flavored varieties that might contain wheat if the label isn’t clear.

. Most major brands are considered gluten-free but beware of flavored varieties that might contain wheat if the label isn’t clear. French fries and other fried products. These should be okay since they’re generally cooked in a dedicated fryer, although you should always check with individual restaurants to confirm this is the case before eating them. You’ll also want to steer clear of any creamy or tomato-based sauces that could have been thickened with wheat flour – ask if possible for sauces on the side so you can add them yourself.

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